Magical realism

#ReadProud Reading Challenge

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The month of June is Pride month for a lot of us, and for the book community this gives readers a chance to find books by LGBTQ+ Authors or that involve members of this community. I’ve seen a lot of #ReadProud challenge post floating around, and while this is not a challenge I hope you find books from this list as well, and get around to reading them.  My fear however, is that I don’t want this to be a fab, cishet people reading queer Lit because its Pride Month, this should be almost an everyday thing. This  #Readproud is divided into  four categories. YA, Adult, Memoirs essays and Short stories, and a bonus section with a few movies.

 

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YA LGBTQ+

  • Grasshopper Jungle x Andrew Smith
    • Bisexuality, Love triangle, Aliens bugs, Dystopian, Historical
  • None Of The Above x I. W. Gregorio
    • Intersex, Identity, secrets, love, acceptance
  • Simon vs Homo Sapiens Agenda
    • Gay, Identity, Oreos, Relationship, acceptance
  • More Happy Than Not x Adam Silvera
    • Gay, Identity, Loss, Acceptance, Bullying, Western Influence, Family Issues, Memory.
  • Not Otherwise Specified x Hannah Moskowitz
    • Lesbian, Acceptance, Identity, stereotypes, religion.
  • South of Sunshine x Dana Eldendorf
    • Lesbian, coming out, small town, religion, bigotry, struggle with faith, diverse LGBT characters. Racism.
  • Parrotfish x Ellen Wittlinger
    • Trans FtM, transition, serendipity, acceptance, bigotry.
  • Luna x Julie Anne Peters
    • Trans MtF, Gender Idetity, acceptance, Trigger Warned, support, forced therapy,
  • Hero x Perry Moore
    • Gay, Superhero, acceptance, dystopian.
  • Chulito x Charles Rice-Gonzalez
    • coming out love story, queer youth culture, latino, bullying.

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Adult LGBTQ+

  • Rubyfruit Jungle x Rita Mae Brown
    • Lesbian, Gender roles, period piece, acceptance, sexuality
  • Faggots x Larry Kramer
    • Gay men, relationships. coming of age.
  • Giovanni’s room x James Baldwin
    • coming out, coming of age, Travel, Paris, American, gender norms, societal norms, love,
  • Plan B x SJD Peterson
    • Androgynous, gender non-conforming, football player troupe, acceptance, problematic element, cliché love story.
  • The Children of Gavrilek x Julie Kirion Chandler
    • LGBT characters, magical realism, diversity, Cuban, Love, Acceptance.
  • Fun Home x Alison Bechdel
    • Love, Coming out, parental issues, trust, confusion.
  • Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Shope Café x Fannie Flagg
    • Lesbian, Tomboy, love, murder, mystery.
  • Confessions of a Mask x Yukio Mishima
    • Code-switching, Erotic fantasy moments, religion, coming of age, acceptance,
  • Down to the Bone x Mayra Lazara
    • Cuban American, Lesbian, homeless, shelter, acceptance, love.
  • In The Blood x Lisa Unger
    • Trans, Mystery, lies,  not centered around transition, college, love.
  • Carry me like water x Benjamin Alire Saenz
    • Intersectionality, HIV / AIDS, Magical realism, secrets, lies.

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LGBTQ+ Memoirs, collection of short stories,  Essays

  • Redefining Realness x Janet Mock
    • Trans, Own Voice, Memoir
  • Fire shut up in my bones: A memoir x Charles M. Blow
    •  Childhood abuse,  Acceptance, Own Voice
  •  A Cup of Water Under my Bed x Daisy Hernandez
    • Cuban-Columbian, race relations, love, Lesbian, Bisexuality, Transmen. Own Voice. Memoir
  • Teaching the cat to sit x Michelle Theall
    • religion, lesbian, catholic, love, memoir, own voice.
  •  Manning up: Transsexual Men on finding brotherbood, family and themselves
    •  Own voices, intersectionality, personal narratives.
  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens speak out
    • Transgender + gender neutral Young Adults, interviews, own voices.
  • Persistence: All Ways Butch and Femme
    • short stories, Queer Authors, gender sterotypes,
  • Labor of Love: The Story of One Man’s Extraordinary Pregnancy
    • Transparents, parenthood, acceptance, sterotypes, gender norms, societal expectations.
  • Quarantine x Rahul Mehta
    • Indian-American gay men, family issues, western privilege + lifestyle, own voices.

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Extra: Movies ( Just in case you need to put a book down for a moment or two)

  • Paris is Burning
    • On Netflix, Queer men of color culture, vogue + Ballroom history, Origins of “shade” and “Tea”, highly recommended.
  • How to survive a Plague
    • Early HIV/ AIDS activism, on Netflix, informational.
  • Milk
    • Biopic Harvey Milk, politics, Murder, LGBT history
  • Boys Don’t Cry
    • Transman, Hate crime, Love, Bullying
  • The Laramie Project
    • Bullying, documentary, Matthew Shepard.
  • But I’m a Cheerleader
  • My Own Private Idaho
  •  TransAmerica
  • The Danisha Lady
  • Cabaret
  • The Rocky Horror Picture

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MIDNIGHT’S CHILDREN post-colonial book review

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MIDNIGHT’S CHILDREN

Let me start by saying this book is dense, Salman Rushdie took his time writing this book. We follow the story of the protagonist Saleem, who as the book progresses is falling apart more and more. (Literally)  This book is far from a fast pace book. If ever an award for a book that beats around the bush and alludes to things were given out, Midnight’s Children would win the award every time. There is a lot to take in. One of the biggest themes is fragmentation: Both of his body and the land. The book takes place during the territory conflict in India. Our protagonist is has abilities along with other people who share something in common with him. Throughout the novel Saleem is constantly reminded of the conflict, both internal and external, he has to deal with. This book does NOT lack in culture, from the character names to locations, Rushdie does a wonderful job importing the reader to India and Pakistan. Though this book does drag at times, Rushdie inserts a character to make fun of you for being bored and impatient. When you’ve heard those particular details three times already he tells them to you a fourth.

This book beats the reader over the head with its flamboyant mysticism–maddeningly repetitive, sickeningly self-conscious, pompous and insistent. It’s a smack-you-upside-the-head and shout-in-your-ear allegory.